How 3D Printing And 3D Scanning Was Used To Recreate An Ancient Japanese Vase

December 05, 2015

How 3D Printing And 3D Scanning Was Used To Recreate An Ancient Japanese Vase

Written By Clare Scott Via 3DPrint.com

In the Neolithic era, Japan was home to a culture of people known as the Jōmon. A race of hunter-gatherers,the Jōmon are known for their distinctive pottery, which is, according to experts, the oldest pottery in Japan. The pottery, made with unrefined clay and decorated by pressing rope into the surface of the clay before firing, has been found in numerous archaeological sites across Japan. Radiologic dating has shown fragments of the pottery to date back as far as 12700 BCE, though many researchers theorize that it was made even earlier than that time.

It’s amazing that anything that old survives today, and it’s even more amazing that some of it still remains whole. James Koyanagi, a retired architect in Burlington, Ontario, is the owner of a Jōmon vase that dates back to 4000 BCE. Such an object leaves researchers salivating, but due to its extreme age and fragility, close study of the vase hasn’t been possible without incurring damage. Until now, that is.

Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario is home to the sophisticated Additive Manufacturing Resource Centre (AMRC). Opened in 2014, it’s already established a reputation for being one of the best sources of 3D printing and additive manufacturing research and education in Ontario. Mohawk professors Reid Flock and Robert Gerritsen decided to take advantage of the facility to recreate Koyanagi’s vase in perfect detail.

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